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Decarbonizing transportation and energy systems

Nations aren’t decarbonizing the global transport sector fast enough. It’s urgent.

Governments face pressure to act now. Many private actors are committed to net zero. Citizens want accountability and more stringent measures to reduce the environmental damages caused by transportation, including greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution.

Transport decarbonization isn’t easy. Still, organizations globally must:

  • Move away from fossil fuel, carbon-intensive combustion engines
  • Identify alternative business models and approaches to move people and freight
  • Match public policies with investments to build green transportation fleets and systems
  • Shift to cleaner transport modes based on concrete strategies
  • Optimize existing infrastructure systems with new technologies

CPCS helps clients with questions such as:

  • What technologies and policies can be adopted to reduce emissions by transport subsectors?
  • What solutions will have the most impact on carbon emissions reductions?
  • How feasible are these technologies and policies in different market contexts?
  • What do they cost and how can they be financed?

Electricity generation accounts for about 25% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

CPCS advises clients across the global power sector in the following areas:

  • Development of renewable-based power projects
  • Advising for long-term sector policy and strategy
  • Advising for modern regulation and sector reform
  • Defining renewable energy strategies and frameworks
  • Assisting with the modernization of utilities and utility performance
  • Examining how to improve electricity access
  • Supporting program execution, among others

Use of renewable energies is still low in many emerging markets

This is largely due to the big upfront costs, lack of institutional capacity at the government level, lack of an environment enabling private sector participation and lack of appropriate legal and regulatory frameworks.

However, provided that an adequate business environment is in place, private investors can actively contribute to renewable energy development, bringing the required financing and know-how.

CPCS helps clients with questions such as:

  • How can governments in emerging economies effectively transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy?
  • What policies, laws, and institutional reforms will enable an increase in renewable energy projects?
  • How can we increase private sector investment in renewable energy?
  • How can we scale up renewable energy and make energy measures more efficient?

Matching climate finance with investment opportunities is a global challenge of unprecedented scale, which could make or break the world’s transition towards sustainable energy and transportation. 

There is a pressing need to deploy more climate finance from global and regional financiers to fund climate-positive projects. Likewise, there is no scarcity in pledges or commitments to deliver climate finance.

The key to unlocking these resources is two-fold: First, to identify a robust pipeline of bankable and credible climate projects; Second, to design optimal financing structures that strategically combine public and private capital.

The opportunity for success lies in understanding the distinctive mandates and risk appetite of various climate finance providers — be it multilateral development banks, bilateral climate funds or private fund managers – which all want their finance to deliver a return, financially and for the climate, albeit to a varying extent.

In turn, governments, infrastructure project developers, and stakeholders need support to navigate the vast climate finance architecture at the national, regional, and international levels, which often come with rigorous and different gatekeeping processes.

Climate finance needs are in the trillions of dollars to:

  • Reduce dependence on fossil fuels which requires significant investments in alternative technologies and approaches
  • Build more public transit and invest in electric vehicle charging infrastructure
  • Produce more renewable energy and distribute it at a low cost for households and businesses
  • Adapt existing infrastructure and build new infrastructure to cope with more variable and extreme climate hazards
  • Support emerging economies in crowding-in investment for climate-smart projects

CPCS helps clients with questions such as:

  • How can emerging economies unlock climate finance for infrastructure that meets both their adaptation and mitigation needs?
  • What financial instruments or mechanisms are suitable for a given climate technology or market?
  • What projects are best suited for climate finance as opposed to traditional finance?
  • How can project bankability for climate-smart projects be improved?

Decarbonizing transportation and energy systems

Nations aren’t decarbonizing the global transport sector fast enough. It’s urgent.

Governments face pressure to act now. Many private actors are committed to net zero. Citizens want accountability and more stringent measures to reduce the environmental damages caused by transportation, including greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution.

Transport decarbonization isn’t easy. Still, organizations globally must:

  • Move away from fossil fuel, carbon-intensive combustion engines
  • Identify alternative business models and approaches to move people and freight
  • Match public policies with investments to build green transportation fleets and systems
  • Shift to cleaner transport modes based on concrete strategies
  • Optimize existing infrastructure systems with new technologies

CPCS helps clients with questions such as:

  • What technologies and policies can be adopted to reduce emissions by transport subsectors?
  • What solutions will have the most impact on carbon emissions reductions?
  • How feasible are these technologies and policies in different market contexts?
  • What do they cost and how can they be financed?

Electricity generation accounts for about 25% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

CPCS advises clients across the global power sector in the following areas:

  • Development of renewable-based power projects
  • Advising for long-term sector policy and strategy
  • Advising for modern regulation and sector reform
  • Defining renewable energy strategies and frameworks
  • Assisting with the modernization of utilities and utility performance
  • Examining how to improve electricity access
  • Supporting program execution, among others

Use of renewable energies is still low in many emerging markets

This is largely due to the big upfront costs, lack of institutional capacity at the government level, lack of an environment enabling private sector participation and lack of appropriate legal and regulatory frameworks.

However, provided that an adequate business environment is in place, private investors can actively contribute to renewable energy development, bringing the required financing and know-how.

CPCS helps clients with questions such as:

  • How can governments in emerging economies effectively transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy?
  • What policies, laws, and institutional reforms will enable an increase in renewable energy projects?
  • How can we increase private sector investment in renewable energy?
  • How can we scale up renewable energy and make energy measures more efficient?

Matching climate finance with investment opportunities is a global challenge of unprecedented scale, which could make or break the world’s transition towards sustainable energy and transportation. 

There is a pressing need to deploy more climate finance from global and regional financiers to fund climate-positive projects. Likewise, there is no scarcity in pledges or commitments to deliver climate finance.

The key to unlocking these resources is two-fold: First, to identify a robust pipeline of bankable and credible climate projects; Second, to design optimal financing structures that strategically combine public and private capital.

The opportunity for success lies in understanding the distinctive mandates and risk appetite of various climate finance providers — be it multilateral development banks, bilateral climate funds or private fund managers – which all want their finance to deliver a return, financially and for the climate, albeit to a varying extent.

In turn, governments, infrastructure project developers, and stakeholders need support to navigate the vast climate finance architecture at the national, regional, and international levels, which often come with rigorous and different gatekeeping processes.

Climate finance needs are in the trillions of dollars to:

  • Reduce dependence on fossil fuels which requires significant investments in alternative technologies and approaches
  • Build more public transit and invest in electric vehicle charging infrastructure
  • Produce more renewable energy and distribute it at a low cost for households and businesses
  • Adapt existing infrastructure and build new infrastructure to cope with more variable and extreme climate hazards
  • Support emerging economies in crowding-in investment for climate-smart projects

CPCS helps clients with questions such as:

  • How can emerging economies unlock climate finance for infrastructure that meets both their adaptation and mitigation needs?
  • What financial instruments or mechanisms are suitable for a given climate technology or market?
  • What projects are best suited for climate finance as opposed to traditional finance?
  • How can project bankability for climate-smart projects be improved?