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CPCS delivers UK-US maritime trade study

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CPCS, in partnership with the Council of the Great Lakes Region, provided insights for the UK’s trade development office on how the Great Lakes ports and the St. Lawrence Seaway could be leveraged further to support maritime trade between the United Kingdom and the United States.

 

Sector: Transport; maritime, freight

Client: United Kingdom’s Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office

Client type: Government

Location: US/UK

Project type: Logistics strategy, supply chain

Advisory services: Data analysis, visualisation, spatial analytics, stakeholder consultations

 

 

Assignment: The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) sought our expertise to inform their long-term trade policy, improve supply chain options, increase trade opportunities, and to provide them with robust public-facing data for engaging stakeholders.

  • When port backlogs and supply chain issues threaten the timeliness and cost of delivering goods, there is a strong incentive to seek alternative supply chain routings. But convincing foreign and domestic organisations to adopt Great Lakes supply chain routes requires a compelling business case for switching.

Services: Our multifaceted approach consisted of an in-depth analysis of imports, exports, and supply chain activities spanning 15 US states. CPCS provided the following expertise:

  • Identified and consulted stakeholders to gain insights into current UK-US trading patterns.
  • Analysed UK, US, and Canada trade and commerce data to validate trading patterns.
  • Triangulated data with consultation feedback to validate findings and ensure the study’s accuracy and reliability.
  • Visualised current trade patterns.
  • Pinpointed growth prospects and reported on potential barriers for trade development.

Outcome: The FCDO is using our findings and recommendations to facilitate their outreach efforts with US ports and UK shippers, including the development of future trade missions between the two groups.